Can you lay laminate wood flooring next to ceramic tile?

I’ve never seen it done in person and I’m worried it won’t look right. I have ceramic tile in the kitchen and am remodeling the living room. I want to put in laminate wood. Will the transition look ok from one surface to the next? Does anyone know where I can view pictures of transitions like this?

You can put laminate flooring next to ceramic tile, hardwood, carpet, stone, sheet vinyl, or any type of flooring.
But you must take into account that the laminate floor is a floating floor and must maintain a gap around its perimeter to allow for expansion and contraction. So to allow for dissimilar materials, and differing heights, a transition strip is installed where these materials adjoin. You will also need base shoe (quarter round) around the perimeter and nosing at any change of elevation.
here is a site that explains these various mouldings and their applications.

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5 Responses to “ Can you lay laminate wood flooring next to ceramic tile? ”

  1. uclueletbc says:

    u might want to put a transitions bead between the 2 materials
    References :

  2. Suzannah says:

    Go to this site and watch the interactive slide show. You will see ceramic tile butt up to a wood/laminate floor. All you will need is a transition strip between the two. It will look nice, and it is done that way all the time.

    http://www.flooringsolution.com/
    References :

  3. Deblieux says:

    You can put laminate flooring next to ceramic tile, hardwood, carpet, stone, sheet vinyl, or any type of flooring.
    But you must take into account that the laminate floor is a floating floor and must maintain a gap around its perimeter to allow for expansion and contraction. So to allow for dissimilar materials, and differing heights, a transition strip is installed where these materials adjoin. You will also need base shoe (quarter round) around the perimeter and nosing at any change of elevation.
    here is a site that explains these various mouldings and their applications.
    References :
    http://www.floorexpert.com/armstrong/fpoxpert.nsf/0cff7808bb7e30d1852566b30069426b/ccc37d8cfd5fa9c185256cde00679bb3?OpenDocument

  4. marshmallowinferno says:

    not to worry, just make sure when you buy your laminate flooring, ask for matching reducer strip(for uneven floors) or T strip (level). It will look fine.

    http://www.topnotchflooring.com/moldings.html
    References :
    laid laminate floors thoughout using t strips and reducer strips.

  5. Don B says:

    it looks finel. I suggest you purchase the reducer strip before you put down the laminate to make sure your spacing between the transition is correct. some use screws to put them down. I find that liquid nails and a couple of barbell weights overnight do a super job, especially when the transition is to bare concrete, or even tile.
    References :

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