How do you put tile over a wood floor?

we live in a frame home built in the 40′s. the floors in the kitchen have about 3 layers of linoleum glued on to them. we pulled up part of the linoleum and found that they had glued linoleum to the original wood floors. we tried to refinish the part that we removed the linoleum from. the wood is ruined as far as refinishing goes. what is the process for laying ceramic tile on the wood floors?

One of the most important things you need to do first is to drive 3" deck screws through everything right down into the floor joists. You need to make sure there is no up and down movement of the subfloor because if there is the grout will fall out and eventually the tiles will crack. After that, set cement board down into a layer of mortar, and screw it all down using recommended screws as per manufacturers spec for the cement board. This will give you a decent underlayment for the tile. Do not even think about using 1/4" plywood as an underlayment as this is a total waste of time and effort. When you screw down the cement board, the recommended method is to place screws 4" apart along all the edges and 8" apart in a grid pattern across the field. When i do mine I exceed that by using a 6" grid pattern. This is somthing you need to pay strict attention to because if you don’t you will end up with a disaster. I’ve seen tile floors that looked like someone took a hammer and smashed tiles all over the floor, and thats because the subfloor was too thin and moved up and down. You need at least 1" total thickness of your subfloor; 1 1/4" is better.

Related posts:

  1. Can kitchen floor tile(porcelain)be layed on wood?
  2. Tile floors on a raised wood foundation?
  3. Preparing WOOD subfloor for ceramic floor tile…?
  4. How do i install ceramic tile over existing wood flooring?
  5. What are the necessary steps for installing a new ceramic tile floor over a wood subfloor?

7 Responses to “ How do you put tile over a wood floor? ”

  1. D. M says:

    Having had the joy of doing just that a couple of months ago, I put concrete backer board down, then put down the tile. Not all that bad, just be sure to get screws specific for securing the backer board to the floor.
    References :

  2. uclueletbc says:

    depends on how flat the floor is now….I might go over the floor with 1/4 inch plywood first to make it flat, nailing the edges of the plywood every 4 inches and nail the field every 6 inches (the field is the center of the plywood) then lay tile
    References :

  3. kitty143cat says:

    Ensure the floor is stable and doesn’t flex. Floor tiles are hard but they’re also brittle so if the floor underneath bends they will crack over time. If your floor gives when you walk over it, you need to stabilize it before laying the tiles.
    Stabilize your floor by setting and adding nails in the existing subfloor, sistering the floor joists underneath the floor and adding bridging between the joists.
    Install cement backerboard onto the stabilized floor. Fasten it with manufacturer recommended glue and then nail the backer board into the floor joists with two inch galvanized nails.
    References :

  4. kata says:

    basically you will have to peel of as much as you can and the put another layer of plywood of sorts
    you can watch the video but I would go to Home Depot and get the info from one of their professionals (and a list of tools and products that you will need)Don’ forget to ask how you level your old floor first

    good luck

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7438461145930153266&q=install+ceramic+tiles&ei=5QEhSLi7IpHk4AKz1bTKAQ
    References :

  5. tootall1121 says:

    You’ll need to use a self leveler. the backerboard is ok, but difficult to make work if the floor isn’t flat. The self leveler will take care of that problem. Then you can use whatever you want on the floor. one problem you’ll have is the doors. between the leveler, backerboard and or the tile, you’ll need shorten the doors, and or install some transitions. If the doors are original to the house, they’re probably solid wood and easily shortened. If not, they can be a real hassle to shorten.
    References :

  6. rtd g says:

    It is already to thick and maybe got to be removed all the way. You know one day I read in http://www.architecture-guides.com and found my answer. Why don’t you give it a try to check.
    Good luck!
    References :

  7. gobonzzo says:

    One of the most important things you need to do first is to drive 3" deck screws through everything right down into the floor joists. You need to make sure there is no up and down movement of the subfloor because if there is the grout will fall out and eventually the tiles will crack. After that, set cement board down into a layer of mortar, and screw it all down using recommended screws as per manufacturers spec for the cement board. This will give you a decent underlayment for the tile. Do not even think about using 1/4" plywood as an underlayment as this is a total waste of time and effort. When you screw down the cement board, the recommended method is to place screws 4" apart along all the edges and 8" apart in a grid pattern across the field. When i do mine I exceed that by using a 6" grid pattern. This is somthing you need to pay strict attention to because if you don’t you will end up with a disaster. I’ve seen tile floors that looked like someone took a hammer and smashed tiles all over the floor, and thats because the subfloor was too thin and moved up and down. You need at least 1" total thickness of your subfloor; 1 1/4" is better.
    References :